Partnering for Cures: How Patients Can Stop Talking and Start Doing Something

Earlier this week, more than 700 thought leaders from throughout the healthcare industry gathered in New York for FasterCures’ Partnering for Cures meeting. This annual event brings together a variety of decision-makers from across diseases who are motivated by the same mission – to reduce the time and cost of getting new therapies from discovery to patients.

JRowbottomFor many attendees, the cause is personal, as they advocate on behalf of a loved one or community. That’s the case for Jeff Rowbottom, who is a member of the MRA Board of Directors. Jeff became involved in MRA after his own diagnosis. He was invited to speak at the closing plenary during Partnering for Cures, sharing insight based on personal experience. Jeff was introduced by his own oncologist, Jedd Wolchok, from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

In his introduction, Dr. Wolchok described Jeff as the “ultimate activist patient.”

During Jeff’s talk, he offered advice to others going through a life-changing medical diagnosis:

  1. Network as much as possible. Reaching out to others –organizations, patients, doctors – helped Jeff understand and process his melanoma diagnosis. And seek out the best care. “You can learn a lot even without a Ph.D.,” says Jeff.
  2. Don’t underestimate the power of one. Jeff believes there is a role for everyone to play, regardless of how powerless they may feel. Tackling such a large issue as curing cancer can seem daunting. “Lots of people may say ‘who am I?’ to work on such a big issue,” says Jeff. “But you really never know until you try, and it’s important we all try.”
  3. Connect the dots. Time is the most precious commodity of all, and based on his own experience, Jeff believes it’s important to make connections quickly to have an impact. “You can save people’s lives by getting them to the right doctor.”

Watch Jeff’s speech here. https://youtu.be/VQoA1JtJq0c?t=47m12s

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