A Daughter Reflects on Her Father’s Battle with Melanoma

By Samantha Stinchcomb

This week, we feature a guest post by Samantha Stinchcomb, a student at the University of Delaware. When her father succumbed to melanoma, Samantha and her family and friends founded the Wayne Stinchcomb Big Orange Foundation to raise money for melanoma research and to educate her local community about the disease and the importance of early detection.

Big Orange photo

Samantha with her dad, Wayne

At 13, while most girls were picking out a dress to wear to the 8th grade dance, I was busy picking out a quote for my dad’s tombstone. After 3 years full of long doctor appointments, harsh experimental treatments, extended hospital stays, little good news, lots of bad news, and hours of prayer, my father had lost his battle to melanoma.

It began in 2007 when my mom noticed a suspicious mole on my dad’s back. Starting with the initial dermatologist visit, my parents were always open and honest with my brother and me about what was happening. I can remember every single conversation we had after each doctor appointment or hospital visit. They tried to explain things as clearly as they could, but being only 13, I had a hard time understanding everything. In the beginning, it all seemed so simple: remove the mole and the cancer would be gone. I never expected we’d still be having those conversations three years later.

I specifically remember talking with my parents after they learned about immunotherapy. Considering I was struggling in my 8th grade science class, I didn’t really understand the concept. My mom tried to explain by comparing it to Pac-Man. She said the cells made in the lab would “eat away” at my dad’s tumors. It was our final option and, even though it was another experimental treatment, we had to have faith and pray it would work.

Initially, the treatment was going well. My once bed-ridden father, so weak he was only recognizable by his beaming smile, was becoming himself again. He was eating regularly, laughing a lot, and even leading my basketball team all the way to the championships as our coach. Christmas of 2009, my father had been declared three months No Evidence of Disease (NED) and my family couldn’t be happier.

However, just 10 short days later, our life got flipped upside down once more. My parents came home from a check-up completely silent. No one spoke but no one needed to; it was understood. The immunotherapy had been unsuccessful and the melanoma was beginning to attack other organs in my dad’s body. We were out of options and there was nothing else we could do. Three months later, at 12:37 am on April 27, 2010, I lost my father to melanoma.

Although not a day goes by where I don’t miss him, I now smile instead of cry because I know God chose my father for a reason. God knew who my father was, how many lives he touched in his short time here, and what those people were capable of. My parents’ friends founded the Wayne Stinchcomb Big Orange Foundation and has turned our tragedy into something amazing. Since Big Orange’s founding in 2010, there have been 11 new approved treatment options for melanoma, which we like to attribute in part to the $85,000 we’ve raised and donated to Melanoma Research Alliance. In addition to the funds we’ve raised, our advocacy and my father’s story has influenced many to get their skin checked and catch precancerous cells early.

People always say to me, “If only your father was diagnosed just one year later, he would’ve had treatment options,” but I don’t think about it like that. My dad was always the first one to try something new and the last one to give up. Whatever he did in life, he had to do it big and this rings true even for his battle with melanoma. The way I see it, my dad is one of the reasons all of these treatment options exist in the first place. Because of his journey and experiences with novel treatments, someone, somewhere is singing their daughter to sleep, kissing their wife goodnight, and waking up to a new day because they now have options when facing the monster that is melanoma.

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “A Daughter Reflects on Her Father’s Battle with Melanoma

  1. Samantha your dad would be very proud of you and I for one owe him a big thank you for being one of the first pioneers of new treatments 😊without people like him being willing to go first where others haven’t been in terms of treatment we wouldn’t have the options we have today I hope he is in a happy place 😊

  2. I would like to thank your farther on behalf of my family, because at present my husband is undergoing Immunotherapy and so far so good. So from the bottom of my heart Thankyou xxxx

  3. Samantha, thank you for this poignant post. I’m sure that your father would be so proud of the woman you have become and for the advocacy work that your family is doing for melanoma research. My husband was diagnosed with Stage IV melanoma in August of 2015. He is 35 years old and we have two young children- ages 2 and 4. After surgery and immunotherapy treatment, he is now NED (but still dealing with major side effects of the immunotherapy). I will be forever grateful to the patients and families that have come before us and who have forged new paths for melanoma and cancer treatment. My hope is that my husband will be able to see his young children grow up. I am so sorry for your loss and so thankful for your advocacy.

  4. Sam, this is so well-written! I know your dad is smiling down and is so very proud of you. What a wonderful tribute to him.
    Siobhan Powers – Colleen’s Mom

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s