Sports Authority Helps to Shine Some Light on Melanoma

By Jennifer Engel

Development Manager, Foundations and Campaigns

In recognition of Melanoma Awareness Month in May, Sports Authority deployed its fifth in-store donation and consumer awareness campaign to raise money for MRA’s research program and to educate customers on ways to reduce their risk of melanoma. Throughout the month, shoppers had the opportunity to round their purchase total up to the nearest dollar, with the remaining cents going directly toward melanoma research.

In just 31 days, Sports Authority customers at approximately 460 stores in the United States and Puerto Rico raised an incredible $278,000, which brings the retail chain’s total fundraising over five years to nearly $1.2 million to support melanoma research. Stores also housed important educational information about the risks associated with melanoma and recommendations on how patrons can protect their skin.

As one of the largest nationwide sporting goods retail chains, Sports Authority is in a unique position to raise the profile of MRA and its mission while encouraging the sale and use of sunscreen and sun-protective clothing.

We at MRA are thankful for the hard work of the Sports Authority leadership and corporate team as well as the store managers and cashiers across the nation who are the drivers of the campaign’s success. Engaging consumers—especially those drawn to active, outdoor lifestyles and recreation—in understanding the real dangers of melanoma and soliciting their support in the cause are essential to preventing new cases of melanoma.

The Sports Authority campaign is one of several MRA corporate fundraising programs in 2015. Through our alliances with companies, we’re able to amplify our reach to broader audiences with messages about the sun’s damaging rays, the importance of daily sunscreen use, and the need to be aware of changes in one’s skin.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently released data about melanoma, and melanoma rates are expected to continue to rise. The need for awareness, prevention, and research to learn more about this disease is urgent.

Thanks to collaborations with partners like Sports Authority, and the support of our founders, MRA can continue to dedicate 100% of donations to our research program to develop better prevention, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to combat melanoma.

Corporate Partners Join in the Fight Against Melanoma

By Logan Kastner 
Director of Development and Marketing

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Melanoma Awareness Month is off to a great start! We have so many people and corporations to thank for all they are doing to raise awareness of this deadly cancer. Like so many of you, the Melanoma Research Alliance is committed to ending death and suffering caused by melanoma. And, we are passionate about building partnerships that will help us continue to fund cutting-edge melanoma cancer research.

We collaborate with like-minded corporations through cause marketing programs that promote melanoma awareness among the public and generate critical funding all year round. Our corporate partners help us to extend our reach by tapping into new networks to share important messages about melanoma research and melanoma prevention. They have devoted time, energy and resources to help raise awareness and funds that support MRA.

Nearly 20 companies have joined our efforts to make a difference against this disease. We encourage you to check out our corporate partners page and consider supporting them. Together, we’ll make a greater impact and truly make a difference in the fight against melanoma!

About The Author

Logan E. Kastner is Director of Marketing and Development for the Melanoma Research Alliance. Kastner joined MRA in 2015 from the Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA), where she worked as senior director of member value creation and meeting services.

Immunotherapy & Awareness: Fighting Melanoma on Two Fronts

MRA is saddened by the news that Mark Carter lost his battle with melanoma this week.  We send our condolences to his family and friends.   He had hoped that sharing his story would educate and raise awareness of this deadly disease.    

I first went to see my doctor in 1999 after my wife’s prompting.  She had noticed a mole on my lower right abdomen that had changed shape and wanted me to get it checked.  My doctor told me it was nothing to be concerned about and sent me home.  The mole continued to grow and again my wife told me to go see the doctor.  I did and this time he agreed to remove it.

A week later, my doctor rang me at work and told me that it was malignant melanoma.  Both my wife and I were totally devastated by this news.

Things were a bit of a blur after this, but I had a wide-level excision and regular check-ups for 10 years after surgery.  Finally, I was discharged from the hospital feeling incredibly relieved that the disease had not recurred.

In April 2012, I woke up one morning with a painful lump under my left armpit and the alarm bells started ringing in my head.  I saw my doctor who said he was 80% sure it was an infected lymph node but could not rule out melanoma due to my past history.  The lump never improved, so it was removed by surgery and I was told that the melanoma had returned.  I was now stage IIIC.

The first CT scan taken within three months of my surgery showed that my disease had not been contained, so I was put on the BRAF inhibitor treatment, vemurafenib.  I was now a stage IV terminal patient.  Three months later, the next scan revealed that I had shown a complete response to this amazing drug.  Unfortunately, 13 months later the disease came back.  Vemurafenib is only a life prolonger, not a cure, and resistance usually occurs.

Finally, I was put on the immunotherapy drug, ipilimumab, and a few weeks ago I finished my last infusion.  My next scan will show if I am a responder or not, but even if I do fail to respond I am lucky enough to have been offered the chance to take the new anti-PD-1 drug, nivolumab, under the expanded access scheme in the UK.

Although I had 13 years clear of the disease, I now count my lucky stars that there are treatments available that have kept me alive for 18 months.  I truly believe there has been a huge paradigm shift in melanoma treatments, particularly in the field of immunotherapy.  In maybe five years’ time, melanoma will no longer be a terminal disease but more of a chronic illness.

I now devote most of my time to raising awareness of the risk factors and causes of melanoma.  Still far too many people are ignorant of the dangers of excessive UV exposure.  I believe that education is the key to increasing awareness and ultimately reducing the recent explosion in melanoma incidence.

 

Mark and Liz Carter edit

About the Author

Mark Carter, 56, lived in the United Kingdom with his lovely wife Liz.  He was a UK-based melanoma awareness advocate and anti-sunbed campaigner who worked to raise awareness of this deadly disease.  You can learn more about Mark’s journey and his advocacy work on his blog: http://www.melanomaman.co.uk/

 

 

Melanoma Awareness From a High Schooler’s Perspective: Where We Are and Where We Need To Be

Not many teenagers know that melanoma is the number one new cancer diagnosed in young adults ages 25-29. It is also difficult to believe that as with many mistakes made at a young age, neglecting sun safety during childhood and adolescence can harm you later in life.

Most of my peers would never dream of lighting a cigarette, yet few would think twice about laying out unprotected at the pool or beach.  Luckily, people are beginning to understand the dangers of indoor tanning, appropriately likening tanning beds to coffins. In previous years, girls would go to tanning beds before school dances. They now settle for a safer (but orange) alternative: spray-tans. Skin cancer awareness has increased, sadly due to the rise in its prevalence, but there is still a ways to go. Most people I know have yet to realize that unprotected sun exposure is just as deadly as a tanning bed.

They're called artificial sun for a reason

They’re called artificial sun for a reason

My paler friends are the most vigilant about sunscreen use. Not one of them wants to get sunburned, so they’re sure to use (and re-apply!) broad-spectrum, high-SPF sunscreen to protect themselves. They do this to escape short-term effects of the sun, but rarely think about the sun’s capability for long-term damage. They are correct in practice, but lack part of the motive for their protective actions. Maybe this is why the occasional girl will still come home from spring break bright red.  They don’t know the danger and how one blistering sunburn in childhood or adolescence doubles their risk for melanoma.

Many of my friends have olive-toned skin, like I do, that tans easily and rarely burns. It is hard for people with this skin type to think twice about going to the beach and getting a dark tan.  Ironically, we are quick to criticize our fair-skinned friends when they get badly sunburned, but the truth is everyone is at risk for melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer.

Tanning is a sign of our body’s response to damage caused by harmful UV rays. Without sunscreen, UV rays from the sun penetrate the skin and damage DNA. Cells called melanocytes can begin to grow uncontrollably because of change in their genetic makeup, and melanoma (skin cancer of melanocytes) develops. Many people do not see skin cancer as a big deal. It is often thought of as a spot that can be removed and forgotten. However, this is not the case with melanoma, which makes up only 4% of skin cancer cases but 80% of skin cancer deaths. Melanoma spreads extremely rapidly and if not caught and treated early on, will spread to the lymph nodes and vital organs. Stage 0 or 1 melanoma has a 90% cure rate, while Stage 4 melanoma patients have a median life expectancy of less than a year. If more people knew these facts, the melanoma death rate could decrease significantly.

What does the future hold for melanoma awareness? Teenagers have already progressed to the point where most of us avoid tanning beds. The next step is to be better at protecting ourselves from the sun, even though it means giving up tanning in favor of sunscreen, healthy skin, and a melanoma-free life. If we can be truly and completely aware of the sun’s hazards, we can motivate ourselves and others to eradicate this aggressive but completely preventable disease.

About the Author

abouttheauthorI’m Isabella Todaro, a rising junior at Georgetown Visitation in Washington, D.C. I have spent this past week as a volunteer at MRA and learned a lot in the process. My cousin has been working here for two years, so I was already interested in the organization before I decided to volunteer. The experience has been great, as I have learned information that otherwise might have remained unfamiliar to me. Like many people, I used to think that getting sunburned, but not getting a tan, puts people at risk for melanoma. Now I know that both of these dangerous behaviors are risky. After learning this and so much more at MRA, I intend to practice sun safety and let others know why they should, too.

Melanoma News Round-Up, June 21

Hello everyone!  We hope you had a wonderful week and you’ve been staying sun safe.  Here are a few highlights to share with you:

High school students created melanoma awareness videos to warn their peers about the dangers of melanoma as part of the Jeff Dulude Melanoma Foundation & Edgemaker’s Defeat Melanoma PSA contest.  We think you’ll agree that the results are powerful and moving.

 

Top 30 Grant-Giving Disease Foundations via GEN (Spoiler: MRA is #1)

More Arrows in the Arsenal: dramatic advacenments in Immunotherapy offer news options for patients with melanoma via John Hopkins Medicine

What’s the Best Sunscreen For You via U.S. World News & Report

Balloons raise money for melanoma sufferer via The Examiner

Sunscreen alone not enough to protect against melanoma via Medical News Today

Checkpoint agents are shifting paradigms toward immunotherapy via OncLive

Cancer survivor continues to fight via Livingston Daily

Tales from ASCO: The future of cancer research via Philly.com

Best not to fool around with the sun gods via Dallas Morning News